Underhill in the field

Untangling the Web: Indigenous Linguistic and Cultural Knowledge and Americanist Anthropology

Monday, October 1, 2018
4:30 pm
Heritage Room, Shriver Center

Through a series of ethnographic vignettes, this talk considers the opportunities and challenges of repatriating intangible cultural property for American Indian communities in the United States.  In particular, it will consider how Indigenous communities are using resources—especially language materials, gathered during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries—for linguistic and cultural revitalization and maintenance programs, detailing the steps that are necessary to make these materials relevant for contemporary use.

This lecture is part of the Indigenous Speakers Series/LICA (Lectures in Contemporary Anthropology)

Mindy Morgan is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and an affiliated faculty member of the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program at Michigan State University.  Her work lies at the intersection of linguistic and sociocultural anthropology and concerns issues such as Indigenous language use and transmission, literacy practices, and knowledge construction among both historic and contemporary American Indian communities.  She is the author of ’The Bearer of this Letter’: Language Ideologies and Literacy Practices among the Fort Belknap Communities (University of Nebraska, 2009).

This event is sponsored by: the Department of Anthropology, the AT Hansen Lecture Fund, and the Myaamia Center

Mindy Morgan
Mindy Morgan
Associate Professor of Anthropology & American Indian Studies at Michigan State University